Connecting To An Oracle Database From Power Pivot

Connecting to an Oracle Database from Power Pivot

Guest Post by Andrew Todd

Intro by Avi: Andrew has been a part of PowerPivotPro family for a while now and has been doing wonders for the clients he has been working with. You have probably heard Rob talk about the “Data Gene”, well Andrew is the ideal specimen for that breed.
Recently I had worked with a client where we spent quite some time just trying to figure out how to connect Power Pivot to their Oracle database. Andrew here lays it all out in simple step by step approach. Andrew’s got a lot of wisdom to share and you should all look forward to more posts from him. Take it away Andrew…

Oracle Databases

The amount of data around us is staggering. Statistics citing the amount of data being generated daily describe it in terms of exabytes (1 exabyte is 1 BILLION gigabytes!) In fact, the amount of data generated daily now exceeds the entire storage capacity of the entire world in 1986!

In a world with that much data, we’re lucky to have tools like Power Pivot and Power Query that offer easy connection to data sources that just sort of … clicks! However, if you’ve tried connecting to an Oracle database in Power Pivot you might have had some trouble. Fear not, here’s how you can make your Oracle database connections click just like all the rest!

Why aren’t my Oracle connections ‘clicking’?


For Excel pros, Oracle databases are a bit different, because there are a few key connection enabling components that are not automatically included with most users’ setups:

1.) Connection details – for Oracle databases, the connection details are included either in the connection string itself (EZConnect) or in a flat file called TNSnames.ora. Don’t worry, it isn’t as complicated as it sounds! Smile

2.) Oracle data providers – You can think of these as the communication link between Power Pivot and the Oracle database.

Make a Call to your DBA for some details!

DBA to the Rescue

Before you attempt to connect to your Oracle database, you’ll need to contact your friendly Oracle DBA for the following information:

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Consolidated Worksheets with Power Query

by Matt Allington

The more I use Power Query, the more I want to use Power Query – and of course the more I learn.  I have seen quite a few references on the Web to “consolidating multiple Excel Workbooks into a single table”, but I came across a problem working with a client recently where I had to undo someone else’s ‘helpful’ partitioning of data into separate worksheets in the one workbook.  You may have come across the problem yourself.  Someone has been collecting data over time, and they start a new sheet every month.


Well intentioned but actually quite unhelpful.

The procedure I use here to bring this all back together in a single table is the same basic concept as consolidating multiple workbooks, however I have learnt a thing or two since the first time I copied someone else’s pattern on how to do this.  Specifically I have learnt the correct and easiest way to create and work with Power Query functions.

The basic process/pattern is:

  1. Create a query to import a single sheet of your data.  Do all the transformations you need here.
  2. Convert the basic query from step 1 above into a function (the easy way) while keeping some backwards capability.
  3. Create a second query that uses the function from step 2 and consolidates all the objects (Sheets in this example), but the same principles apply for any other object.

There are other approaches you can use to do this (as is often the case with Excel) but this procedure demonstrates how easy it is to write Functions if you understand the basic concepts.

First Create a new blank workbook edit a single sheet

Go to Power Query Menu\From File\From Excel.  You will see in the navigator the list of sheets.  Just select any one of these sheets in the list.   For this process to work, the column structure of the sheets needs to be the same.  

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Power Update Adds Email Notifications, Macro Support, and 100% Free Version

Post by Rob Collie

Power Update Now Emails PDFs or Full Power Pivot / Power BI Workbooks to Email Recipients

Autorefreshes Your Power Pivot Workbook as Frequently as Desired, Auto-Publishes to Any Location, and Now Sends Email Notifications of Success/Failures – With Attachments!

Our Gift to the Community:  New, Improved, and Free

The team has added several new features in the latest version of Power Update.  One of them (email notifications that optionally attach the updated workbook or PDF-ified version of the workook), is pictured above.

But the biggest new “feature” is that there’s now a 100% free version.  Go ahead and download it from the link below, and start using it today.

It will work forever – no trial expiration – and will never require payment.


(Alternate Location Here in case DropBox is blocked)

It will be installed and working in less than five minutes.  Have fun, and if you have any troubles, report those on the Power Update Forum.

“Why Free?  What’s the Catch?”

Simply put, we want everyone to have it.  Everyone.  It’s a game changer.  It will lead to more Power Pivot / Power BI adoption and overall goodness, which is very much something we want.

The only limitation in the free version is that it will only schedule one workbook. Every last feature is available – email, PDF attachments, publish to SharePoint and even SSAS Tabular.

So if you’ve only got one important workbook, you can use the free version forever.  A lot of people will run that way, and we’re ok with that.  If you someday end up with more than one workbook that needs refresh, you can opt to purchase the full version, which can schedule as many workbooks as you want.

“Wait, Can’t I Cheat That With Multiple Computers?”

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Tales from the Trenches: My personal experience with Power Update (by Tim Rodman)

Guest Post by Tim Rodman, currently blogging about reporting in Acumatica ERP @

***Update #1:  a Free Version of Power Update is now available.  More info here.

***Update #2:  There is now a forum for Power Update questions, located here.

Intro from Rob: I’m what you might call a “gift horse optimist” – strongly positive outlook, but when the hoped-for thing finally arrives, I find myself closely inspecting it, testing it, before I trust it enough to advocate it to others.  I went through this same process with Power Pivot itself – I “saw” its gamechanging power in 2010, but it was a full eighteen months before I finally dropped all disclaimers and just started calling it far better – period – than anything we’ve had before.”

Similarly, I’ve long known that Power Update would be a MAJOR win for us in the Power Pivot and Power BI communities.  But I am willing to advocate it now only because I’ve watched others – like Scott, and Tim below – use it successfully, in production environments, in recent months.  (Also see my post last week “introducing” Power Update in case you missed it).

Take it away, Tim…

I first found out about Power Update two months ago via a LinkedIn post by Christian Floyd.

It took me a while to realize that he wasn’t talking about a theoretical future idea, but an actual product, something that exists today. Click the picture below to see the entirety of my foolishness. It wasn’t until I talked to him directly that I realized what Power Update really was and I was immediately interested.


He got me a beta version of Power Update and I began testing it at the company I work for: a manufacturing company in Cleveland, OH called The Robbins Company.

Our Background

We started using Power Pivot at The Robbins Company back in 2013 and I wrote about our experience on this blog (click here).

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Introducing Power Update!

Post by Rob Collie

***Update:  check out Scott Senkeresty’s review of Power Update over on Tiny Lizard.

***Update #2:  a Free Version of Power Update is now available.  More info here.

***Update #3:  There is now a forum for Power Update questions, located here.

Power Update:  Refresh any Power Pivot / Power BI Workbook, from Any Data Souce, and Publish to Any Location (SharePoint or Otherwise)

A brand-new software utility designed from the ground up as
a “Companion” to  Power Pivot, Power Query, and the entire Power BI stack.

Definitely Click on the Image for Larger Version – Surprises Lurk Therein

Do Any of These Sound Familiar?

Common Problems with Power Pivot and Power BI Scheduled Refresh

Power Update Helps With ALL of These (And a Few More, Too)

“What IS It?”

OK, a few things:

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